The Homing Place: Indigenous and Settler Literary Legacies of the Atlantic by Rachel Bryant

From Wilfred Laurier University Press' Indigenous Studies Series comes Rachel Bryant's The Homing Place, which refuses to be pigeon-holed to any one category.

Reviews of Books on the 2018 Atlantic Book Awards Shortlist

The shortlists for the Atlantic Book Awards have been announced, and since The Miramichi Reader has reviews of seven of them (plus one children’s book), I thought it might be helpful to provide links to the reviews for the various nominees. The books that have been reviewed here will have links embedded in them and will open in a new window. Some of the links will redirect you to the Consumed by Ink website, should they happen to have a review there.… Continue reading

Peninsula Sinking by David Huebert

(The following review is reproduced in part by the kind permission of Naomi MacKinnon of the Consumed by Ink book review blog. – James)

at the cover of this book. It couldn’t be more stunning. With stories to match. Peninsula Sinking is David Huebert‘s first short story collection. He has won the CBC Short Story Prize, the Sheldon Currie Fiction Prize, and the Walrus Poetry Prize, and is the author of one poetry collection We Are No Longer the Smart Kids in Class (which I haven’t read).… Continue reading

The Endless Battle: The Fall of Hong Kong and Canadian POWs in Imperial Japan by Andy Flanagan

“At age twenty-five, James Andrew Flanagan began an adventure he believed might add a little excitement to his life…..his exciting journey quickly turned into a never-ending nightmare.” So begins author Andy Flanagan in his introduction to a little told part of WWII: the Battle of Hong Kong that started just hours after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and ended on December 25th, 1941. Fought mainly by Canadian troops, the Japanese overpowered the small contingent (who only had their rifles, no tanks) sent to help evacuate Hong Kong.… Continue reading

The Sea Was In Their Blood by Quentin Casey

The following guest review is by David Chau, who is a writer of creative nonfiction, future author of a historical narrative set in Edo-Period Japan, and a University of King’s College MFA graduate in search of great stories. He lives in Kingston, Ontario.)

outsiders eating their lobster suppers in New Glasgow or fish and chips on the patio at North Rustico Harbour with a decor of lobster traps and fishing nets watching the sun setting into the sea, life on the east coast seems idyllic.… Continue reading

A Bird on Every Tree by Carol Bruneau

A Bird on Every Tree won The Very Best! Book Award for Short Stories.

Bruneau is the author of six books, including the recent These Good Hands. Her 2007 novel, Glass Voices, was a Globe and Mail Best Book. She lives with her husband in Halifax, where she teaches writing at NSCAD University.
I had never read Carol Bruneau until receiving this ARC from Nimbus Publishing, and it made me a little anxious for here was a Maritime author I should have been familiar with, yet it is not humanly possible to have read books by all the different authors the East Coast provinces are blessed with.… Continue reading