Through Sunlight and Shadows by Raymond Fraser

Sadly, Through Sunlight and Shadows would prove to be Raymond Fraser’s swan song, as he passed away just a few short months after its publication. It is his fourteenth book of fiction and is an all-new volume of “memoirs” of his fictional/semi-autobiographical character, Walt Macbride. While regular readers of Mr. Fraser’s will be familiar with Walt in all his manifestations, his youngest days growing up in Bannonbridge (an alias for Chatham, NB) are lesser-known.… Continue reading

The Body on the Underwater Road by Chuck Bowie

I write this review of the fourth book of the Donovan: Thief for Hire series, I reflect back on how Three Wrongs was one of the first books I reviewed for The Miramichi Reader. I liked it very much, due to Mr. Bowie’s character development of Sean Donovan the professional thief for hire, which was top-notch and Sean’s personality only grew with each installment of the series.… Continue reading

Meet a Librarian: Dana Horrocks

Horrocks is the Newcastle Public Library’s new Director and since a librarian is practically every book lover’s favourite person, I thought it would be interesting to get to know one better. Dana gladly agreed to be interviewed by The Miramichi Reader.

The Miramichi Reader: First, give us a little background. You’ve only been in the Miramichi a short time, so we would like to know more not only about you but about the road you chose to be where you are now.Continue reading

Tappan Adney and the Heritage of the St. John River Valley by Keith Helmuth

Woodstock, New Brunswick’s Chapel Street Editions must be one of this province’s best-kept publishing secrets. I found out about them quite by accident when another author mentioned one of their books they recently read (the novel Taapoategl & Pallet, which I plan to read soon).

Edwin Tappan Adney is a name well-known to New Brunswickers, particularly in and around the town of Woodstock, which borders on Maine in the central-west area of the province.… Continue reading

Piau: Journey to the Promised Land by Bruce Murray

is encouraging to see more books (either fictional or non-fictional) being written about the Acadians and their lives and way of life before and after 1755. That was the year of “Le Grand Dérangement” when they were the victims of cultural genocide by the occupying British command and put on ships to be dispersed around the globe, never to return to their beloved Acadia. Some stayed, only to be enslaved, forced to work the land they once farmed as their own, but now for British landowners.… Continue reading

Rachel Bryant

The Rachel Bryant Interview

Rachel Bryant is the author of The Homing Place (2017, Wilfred Laurier Press) a book about early settler and Indigenous literature and how we can “listen” to what they have to say today so that we can better understand both distinct groups.

Already it has been shortlisted for several awards:

I have also put it on my 2018 Long-list for a “Very Best!” Book Award for Non-Fiction.… Continue reading

Reviews from the 2017 New Brunswick Book Awards Short List

books from the 2017 New Brunswick Book Awards have been reviewed here at The Miramichi Reader: Wayne Curtis’ Homecoming and Jan Wong’s Apron Strings. Both are worthy contenders in their respective categories. I have also reviewed Rachel Bryant’s The Homing Place which is a very insightful book of early Indigenous and Settler literature. Links to the above reviews can be found below.


Saint John (NB) March 23, 2018 – The Fiddlehead and the Writers’ Federation of New Brunswick have announced the shortlisted titles for the third annual New Brunswick Book Awards.… Continue reading

Long Ago and Far Away by Wayne Curtis

Perhaps you have to be from rural New Brunswick (even the Miramichi) to fully understand Mr. Curtis’ past, his father’s and his grandfather’s lives lived on a farm where you logged some trees for money, grew some crops to feed yourselves and your old mare Jenny and lived in a house with no running water, no indoor plumbing, and little to no insulation. His mother’s saying that “the good old days” weren’t worth two cents has a lifetime of hardscrabble existence to back them up.… Continue reading