The Art and Passion of Guido Nincheri by Mélanie Grondin

beauty of many old churches (particularly cathedrals, basilicas, etc.) is in their architecture as well as in their religious art, whether it is the many large frescoes or the exquisite stained glass windows that adorn them. The late (1885-1973) Italian-Canadian artist and stained glass master Guido Nincheri has enjoyed a recent resurgence of interest, thanks to his grandson Roger Bocchini Nincheri who has been tirelessly photographing and cataloging his grandfather’s hundreds of existing works.… Continue reading

Bryant Freeman: All Things Fishing by Doug Underhill

author Doug Underhill and Nimbus Publishing have truly done the Atlantic salmon sportfishing industry a service by bringing the story of Bryant Freeman to bookshelves. A quiet, unassuming man, Mr. Freeman is well-known and loved by many who fish the Miramichi River and its tributaries.… Continue reading

Daniel Paul, Mi’kmaw Elder by Jon Tattrie

-winning author Jon Tattrie, whose most recent book, Redemption Songs (2016, Potterfield Press) was about the history of Black Africans in North America, has turned his attention to one of the most prominent First Nations personages, Daniel N. Paul, Mi’kmaw Elder.… Continue reading

The Sea Was In Their Blood by Quentin Casey

The following guest review is by David Chau, who is a writer of creative nonfiction, future author of a historical narrative set in Edo-Period Japan, and a University of King’s College MFA graduate in search of great stories. He lives in Kingston, Ontario.)

outsiders eating their lobster suppers in New Glasgow or fish and chips on the patio at North Rustico Harbour with a decor of lobster traps and fishing nets watching the sun setting into the sea, life on the east coast seems idyllic.… Continue reading

New Brunswick Was His Country by Ronald Rees

Rees was born in Wales and for the past twenty-five years, he has lived in St. Andrews, New Brunswick. New Brunswick Was His Country: The Life of William Francis Ganong (2017, Nimbus Publishing) is his latest book.

The name of William Francis Ganong was unfamiliar to me until I read Nicholas Guitard’s book The Lost Wilderness (2015, Goose Lane Editions).… Continue reading

Viola Desmond’s Canada by Graham Reynolds

February being Black History Month in Canada, I was determined to read Viola Desmond’s Canada: A History of Blacks and Racial Segregation in the Promised Land by Graham Reynolds (Fernwood Publishing, 2016) before the month was out. Thank goodness February had 29 days this month, for I finished it on the last day.… Continue reading

Rebel With a Cause: The Doc Nikaido Story by Bretton Loney

As I work in the medical profession, I find books with medical content interesting. However this book has another angle to it that intrigued me: the forced internment of Japanese-Canadians during WWII. Young Harry Nikaido was attending medical school at the University of Toronto in 1942 when Japanese-Canadians living in coastal BC were stripped of all they owned and moved inland, either to interment camps or labour camps.… Continue reading

From Old Hollywood to New Brunswick by Charles Foster

After reading this book (it only took a few hours; it is that fascinating and breezily written), I couldn’t help think of a quote from the Joseph Conrad novel The Rescue in which Edith Travers says to herself after Captain Tom Lingard has related all the imminent dangers of the island near where her yacht has grounded.… Continue reading