Murder Lost to Time by Joseph A. Lapello

year is 1917. Less than two decades into the new century and already the Great War is occurring in the muddy fields of France. Soon there will be the Spanish Influenza which will kill many more millions. An inauspicious start to a new millennium, to be sure. In one of Canada’s largest cities, Toronto, there has been a murder. A cab driver is found dead in west-end Toronto, stabbed multiple times.… Continue reading

The Homing Place: Indigenous and Settler Literary Legacies of the Atlantic by Rachel Bryant

From Wilfred Laurier University Press' Indigenous Studies Series comes Rachel Bryant's The Homing Place, which refuses to be pigeon-holed to any one category.

Hope Restored by Robert A. Moran

Bibliophiles like myself are always on the lookout for new books, and as I live far from any bricks and mortar bookstore, I find books by local authors almost anywhere: a drugstore, a coffee shop, even a family restaurant. That’s where I found Robert A. Moran’s Hope Restored: the Ship Prince Victor, its Iconic Figurehead and the Maritime Heritage of St. Martins, New Brunswick (2017, Hawthorne Lane Publishing).Continue reading

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Argimou: A Legend of the Micmac by S. Douglas S. Huyghue

Argimou_cover in 1755 at the fall of Fort Beausejour to the British, Argimou: A Legend of the Micmac first appeared in print in serialized form in The Amaranth (a New Brunswick literary journal) in 1842. It was very popular since “historical fiction was enjoying wide international popularity” at the time, according to Gwendolyn Davies informative Afterword. Sir Walter Scott’s novels were quite popular at the time and publishers were looking for similar writings to publish for their reader’s entertainment.… Continue reading

How Maine Changed the World by Nancy Griffin

state of Maine, on the extreme northeastern tip of the United States, ranks quite low in population density (41st amongst the other states) and with only a little over 1.3 million residents, it seems improbable that it could have (or does) contribute much to the world outside of it’s 36,000 square miles. (Source: http://worldpopulationreview.com/states/maine-population/)

Perhaps that is why a book such as How Maine Changed the World: A History in 50 People, Places, and Objects (2017, Down East Books) will come as a surprise to those who read it, even “Mainers”.… Continue reading

Where Eagles Lie Fallen by Gary Collins

exceptional 2010 book by Gary Collins, author of The Last Beothuk (2017), Desperation: The Queen of Swansea (2016), Left to Die (2014), and several others (all titles Flanker Press). Mr. Collins is a master storyteller and combined with his fastidious fact-checking, his books make for some of the best historical fiction accounts anywhere. However, with Where Eagles Lie Fallen we have a book based on actual events: the fatal crash of Arrow Air Flight 1285 on December 12th, 1985 killing all on board, most notably men and women of the 101st Airborne Division of the U.S.… Continue reading