Category Archives: Indigenous Titles

Promises to Keep by Genevieve Graham

Promises to Keep won a 2017 The Very Best! Book Award for Historical Fiction.

Set during the time of the Acadian expulsion in 1755 (“Le grand dérangement”) from what is now Nova Scotia. Promises to Keep (2017, Simon & Schuster) contains a stronger, deeper story than its romantic cover art might suggest.… Continue reading

Algonquin Sunset (Algonquin Quest Book #3) by Rick Revelle

It has been two years since Algonquin Spring, was released (Book Two of the Algonquin Quest Series by Rick Revelle) but the timeline has advanced twelve years in Algonquin Sunset, which has allowed Anokì and Pangì, the children of the Algonquin warrior Mahingan, along with their cousins and other youngsters to grow into adulthood and bring them into new adventures as they meet with new tribes, both friend and enemy, in the present day area of the Great Lakes (Superior and Michigan) and even further west to the present day area of northern Minnesota where they meet up with a new fierce enemy: the Lakhotas.… Continue reading

Nta’tugwaqanminen (Our Story) by the Gespe’gewa’gi Mi’qmawei Mawiomi

Subtitled “Evolution of the Gespe’gewa’gi Mi’gmaq” (2016, Fernwood Publishing) this book is the product of years of research commissioned by the organization that represents the three communities of the Mi’gmaq that inhabit the northern part of the Gaspé Peninsula. It also involves the work of the community’s Elders (both oral and written stories), so it is a history written by Aboriginal peoples from an aboriginal perspective.… Continue reading

Bear War-den by Vivian Demuth

Inanna Publications always has something different to read, so I often look to them for a book that is a change of pace from the norm. While browsing their website, I noticed Bear War-den (2015) by Vivian Demuth. In the brief description on the Inanna site it stated: “Told in an experimental style that mixes realism and magical realism, and interrupted by photographs and by the voice of a bear, Bear War-den explores themes of personal and ecological loss, trauma, and of women and non-human animals dealing with oppression within a male-dominated, and often paramilitary-like Parks Management system. Continue reading