The Fiddlehead No.278 Winter 2019

The Winter 2019 issue of The Fiddlehead arrived in my mailbox recently and typically the first thing I do is look at the book reviews, specifically to see if any of the books I have read and reviewed in the past appear in the current issue. Well, I was happy to see two of my favourite books reviewed: Listening for Jupiter and Mister Nightingale. It’s always interesting to read other reviews to see what other, more literate, critics discover in a book that I may not have considered.… Continue reading

The Malahat Review Issue #200

Malahat Review is among Canada’s leading literary journals. Published quarterly, it features contemporary Canadian and international works of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction as well as reviews of recently published Canadian poetry, fiction, and literary nonfiction. Issue #200 also marks the fiftieth issue of this exceptional West Coast-based literary journal. Some excerpts from this issue are available online here: http://www.malahatreview.ca/issues/200.html

Of special note:

Emily Carr’s unpublished memoir “Afterglow” in which she relates the “supreme death-beauty” of three individuals she had known, one being her sister Lizzie:

“Lizzie was beyond, beyond, beyond.… Continue reading

The Fiddlehead No.272 Summer 2017

The “all fiction” issue of The Fiddlehead literary journal is packed with an amazing amount of short stories and reviews by authors from all over Canada. I have been working my way through it and I have hit several standout stories: Mrs Flood was Here by Sam Shelstad about a woman trapped in her car by a wolf.  Another is Mandrill in Repose by Richard Cumyn, an established master of the short story and novella.… Continue reading

The Fiddlehead Issue No.270 (Winter 2017)

Issue No. 270 of the Fiddlehead literary journal sports an attractive cover with art by Ann Manuel entitled “Blur 1” making you feel that what is contained within is something special. There are works of short fiction by Jasmina Odor, Charlie Fiset, David Clerson (an excerpt from his otherworldly novel Brothers (translated by Katia Grubisic), Darryl Whetter and David Carpenter. There are poems from no less than twelve different poets as well as book reviews.… Continue reading