Redemption Songs by Jon Tattrie

Redemption Songs won a 2017 The Very Best! Book Award for Non-Fiction.

do Nova Scotia, Black leader Marcus Garvey, and Rastafarian musician Bob Marley have in common? Very little, you might think until Jon Tattrie weaves some literary and historical magic to make it all seamlessly fit together in Redemption Songs (2016, Pottersfield Press), a treatise against racism and the false “colouring” of humans.… Continue reading

Art Love Forgery by Carolyn Morgan

Newfoundlander Carolyn Morgan has published her first novel, Art Love Forgery (2016, Flanker Press) and fans of historical fiction and romance will certainly appreciate this fine book. It is based on a singular incident in nineteenth-century colonial Newfoundland history when Polish artist (and convicted forger) Alexander Pindikowsky was tasked with beautifying some of St.… Continue reading

Shadow of Doubt: The Trial of Dennis Oland by Bobbi-Jean MacKinnon

It’s not very often you get to review two books covering the same topic practically back-to-back. Such is the case this month (October) with the coverage of the Dennis Oland trial. Dennis Oland was convicted of second-degree murder in the bludgeoning death of his father millionaire Richard Oland in 2011.… Continue reading

The 2016 Winners of “The Very Best” Book Awards

It took a lot of deliberation, but here are seven of “The Very Best” books I have read in the 2015-2016 reading ‘season’ (September 2015 to mid-September 2016, in which I completed reading 80+ books).

It was easy to pick a clear winner in the Young Adult category (simply because I don’t get the opportunity to read that many YA titles): Prisoner of Warren by Andreas Oertel, published by Nimbus.… Continue reading

Desperation: The Queen of Swansea by Gary Collins

Desperation: The Queen of Swansea won a 2017 The Very Best! Book Award for Fictionalized History.

storyteller and prolific author Gary Collins hails from Newfoundland and his previous book, Left to Die concerned the tragic death of 78 seal hunters on an ice floe in 1914.… Continue reading

Prisoner of Warren by Andreas Oertel

World War II Internment Camp B70, better known as Ripples Internment Camp is a little-known part of New Brunswick (and Atlantic Canada) history. Located near the mining town of Minto, the camp existed from 1940-45. Little of it exists today; a concrete structure that supported a wooden water tower is the only permanent part of the camp still there.… Continue reading

Mister Nightingale by Paul Bowdring

Award-winning Newfoundland author Paul Bowdring’s fourth book, Mister Nightingale (2016, Vagrant Press) is an introspective novel, one requiring some patience on behalf of the reader before being gently absorbed into James Nightingale’s world. Mister Nightingale, while being written by Mr Bowdring, is penned as if the fictional character James Nightingale (who is also an author) has written it, adding a high level of startling authenticity to a novel that reads more like a memoir.… Continue reading

Blood of Extraction by Todd Gordon & Jeffery R. Webber

It seems that Latin America is not given much attention these days, unless an international event like the Brazil Summer Olympics directs our attention to that sector of the globe. Yet, there is a multiplicity of issues occurring there as a casual look at the BBC’s Latin America news page proves: economic unrest and uncertainty in Venezuela, a huge cocaine haul in Bolivia, and a drug lord’s luxury prison cell in a Paraguayan prison were just some of the headlines there at the time of this writing.… Continue reading