Beaumont Hamel, Newfoundland Park by Nigel Cave

The Battle of the Somme was one of the bloodiest battles of WWI. Over one million were killed or wounded from July to November 1916. To commemorate the role of Newfoundland and Labradorian troops fighting near the village of Beaumont Hamel one hundred years ago, Flanker Press has acquired the trade book rights to Nigel Cave’s Beaumont Hamel, Newfoundland Park.Continue reading

Only by Blood by Renate Krakauer

World War II. Christians. Jews. Nazis. Poles. Families destroyed, separated, torn apart. These are the background themes to Renate Krakauer’s debut novel Only by Blood (Inanna Publications, 2015). The story ferries back and forth between the past and present as different cultures, faiths and families intersect.… Continue reading

War at Sea by Ken Smith

Seventy years. Yes, it has been 70 years – practically an entire generation – since the end of WWII and, as well, the end of the Battle of the Atlantic. A battle that started just a few hours after the declaration of war in 1939 and ran until the cessation of hostilities in 1945, thus making it the longest-running battle of WWII.… Continue reading

Letters Home: Maritimers and the Great War, 1914-1918 edited by Ross Hebb

This is a real gem of a book and one that any Canadian interested in WWI would enjoy to read; Maritimers especially since all the letters are from soldiers (and a nurse) from Atlantic Canada. Ross Hebb has done a masterful job of editing, collecting and categorizing quite a number of private letters donated by family members to create this insightful, at times entertaining and thoughtful book.… Continue reading

Those Splendid Girls by Katherine Dewar

Those Splendid GirlsMy Goodreads rating: 3 of 5 stars

At first I wasn’t that interested in reading about PEI nurses in WWI, but the book is well-researched and contains excerpts from some of the nurses’ private diaries. There are many photos as well and is a good read for anyone interested in the medical aspects of war, and Canada’s involvement in treating soldiers in various hospitals in the field or back in England.Another fact I learned is that nurses held an officer’s rank in the Canadian army, something that no other army did for their nurses.… Continue reading