The Luminous Sea by Melissa Barbeau

A team of researchers from a nearby university have set up a research station in a fictional outport in Newfoundland, studying the strange emergence of phosphorescent tides. And Vivienne, a young assistant, accidentally captures a creature unknown to science: a kind of fish, both sentient and distinctly female. As the project supervisor and lead researcher attempt to exploit the discovery, the creature begins to waste away, and Vivian must endanger herself to save them both.

Being Mary Ro by Ida Linehan Young

might be forgiven if, after seeing the book’s cover, they think Being Mary Ro (2018, Flanker Press) is another stereotypical Victorian-era romance novel. In some ways it is, but Being Mary Ro is more historical fiction than it is romance, similar to Genevieve Graham’s Promises to Keep. Like that book, it is based on a historical incident and broadened to include fictional characters and other historical references.… Continue reading

Bag of Hammers by Edward Riche

I‘ve always been a fan of good satire. Back in the late 70’s and 80’s I read National Lampoon magazine monthly, watched Saturday Night Live and SCTV weekly. Read Doonesbury and Bloom County Babylon daily. Then came This Hour Has 22 Minutes on CBC. This show introduced me to East Coast humour and satire, specifically that of Newfoundland origins.

Although I’ve never been there (yet), the island of Newfoundland appears to me as a distinct society, as much as Quebec certainly does.… Continue reading

Most Anything You Please by Trudy J. Morgan-Cole

Most Anything You Please (2017, Breakwater Books) is the first book I have read by Ms. Morgan-Cole and it is a solid saga of the Holloway family through several decades. The author was born in, and still lives in the Rabbittown neighbourhood of St. John’s:

“Over the years, I’ve discussed with many friends the fact that, when we were growing up in the 1970s, there was a family-owned convenience store on every corner, most of which have since disappeared.… Continue reading

The End of Music by Jamie Fitzpatrick

Jamie Fitzpatrick is a host and producer at CBC Radio. His first novel, You Could Believe in Nothing, won the Fresh Fish Award for Emerging Writers in Newfoundland and Labrador. He lives in St. John’s.

The story, or stories, since there are two distinct interrelated tales told in The End of Music, centers around Herbert Carter (or Carter as he is most commonly called) a fortyish former guitarist for “Indefinite Yes”, a popular experimental indie rock band in the Toronto club circuit back in the nineties.… Continue reading

The Last Beothuk by Gary Collins

to The Last Beothuk (2017, Flanker Press), Mr Collins’ last book was Desperation: The Queen of Swansea (2016, Flanker Press), which won a “The Very Best!” Book Award in the Historical Fiction category for that year. At the time, I posited that Mr Collins was at the top of his storytelling game. One could only guess what his next subject might be! Well, we didn’t have to wait long, for we have the finished product from Flanker Press on the shelves now.… Continue reading

Too Unspeakable for Words by Rosalind Gill

Gill is originally from Corner Brook and attended Memorial University of NL before going on to do graduate work at McGill University. She is now a Senior Scholar in French and Translation at Glendon College, York University. Her stories and translations from French and Spanish have appeared in various Canadian journals and magazines.

Newfoundland & Labrador’s Breakwater Books has just released what may be considered quintessential short stories of growing up in Newfoundland in the late 50’s to early 70’s.… Continue reading