The Afrikaner by Arianna Dagnino

For the third year in a row, Naomi of the Consumed by Ink book review blog and I have guest-hosted each other’s reviews and my review of The Afrikaner by Arianna Dagnino can be found there. Her reviews are remarkable for their insight and perceptiveness of a novel’s strengths and weaknesses. I encourage you to follow her reviews of CanLit. Often, we review the same books and it’s fun to see what each other takes away from a book.

As for The Afrikaner, it is a superb book, and I am putting it on my 2020 longlist for Fiction for a “The Very Best! Book Award.

Author Allan Hudson posted this comment on his FB page: “The Afrikaner is one of the finest novels I’ve read in some time.”

To read the complete review, please click this link to be taken to the Consumed by Ink website: http://bit.ly/theafrikaner

Here’s an insightful interview with Ms Dagnino at The South Branch Scribbler: http://allanhudson.blogspot.com/2019/07/guest-author-arianna-dagnino-of.html?m=1

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James M. Fisher is the owner and editor-in-chief of The Miramichi Reader. The Miramichi Reader (TMR) —Canada’s best-regarded source for the finest in new literary releases— highlights noteworthy books and authors across Canada from coast to coast to coast (est. 2015). James works and resides in Miramichi, New Brunswick with his wife and their tabby cat.

See also  Excerpt: This is How We Love by Lisa Moore
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Arianna Dagnino
July 4, 2019 06:38

Dear James,
I have just read your review of “The Afrikaner”. Thank you for the kind of words of appreciation. You were able to capture the several layers of discourse (race, group guilt, shame, science, traditional knowledge, magic, hubris) running through Zoe’s story. I see that the reference to and your comments on Conrad have sparked interesting reflections and an online discussion on modern vs postmodern literature. If I may add my bit, I would say that Conrad was a son of his times (as much as we are children of our times) and his writing reflects the ideological mood of imperial Britannia. As a writer, though, I cannot but honour the power of his literary style. Best, Arianna #theafrikanerbook

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