Solitary by Zev Bagel

A powerful tale of the search for meaning, freedom and family bonds. Duncan, a Canadian writer, is incarcerated in Iran’s notorious Evin prison. Hamid, in an adjacent cell, bores a hole in his wall through which the two men whisper their stories, discovering their vastly different experiences, and their shared humanity. Winner of the David Adams Richards award for best novel, the judge described Solitary as “a powerful, propulsive read.” Based on a true story.

The End of Her: Racing Against Alzheimer’s to Solve a Murder by Wayne Hoffman

Who was behind the brutal murder of my great-grandmother? wondered Wayne Hoffman, a New York City-based journalist and novelist. The crime wasn't just a family legend-it made headlines across Canada in 1913-but her killer had never been found. In The End of Her, Hoffman meticulously researches this century-old tragedy, while facing another: his mother's decline from Alzheimer's.

The Devil to Pay: An Inspector Green Mystery by Barbara Fradkin

When a man disappears, the police conclude he is simply fleeing an unhappy home and a mountain of debt. Then a body is discovered. Inspector Green’s daughter, a rookie patrol officer, fears that her actions precipitated the murder and starts to dig for answers. Her search leads her straight into the path of danger. And another body.

The Healer’s Journey by Jeanette Winsor

When Thomas Morley, a young Newfoundland fisherman, is rescued from death by the local witch, he discovers he has the ability to cure sickness and charm blood. A gift, he is told, until seizures and blackouts have him glancing into the future, a place that frightens and confuses him. With folk lore and superstition roiling his world, he knows he’s cursed.

The Days That Are No More: Tales of Kent County New Brunswick by Loney Hudson

The Days That Are No More chronicles people from Kent County, New Brunswick during the 1920s through the 1980s in communities of Targettville, Main River, Bass River, Smith Corner, Emerson, Harcourt, Clairville, Beersville, Fordsmills, Brown's Yard, West Branch, South Branch, Mundleville, and Rexton. They tell of a time when most of the people of Kent County had large families, and children left home at a very young age to find work wherever it could be found. Life was often hard. They lived through war and poverty, and experienced hardships and modernization. This immersive collection of lives tells of a time that no longer exists, except in the heart and minds of booklovers.