Rithimus Aeternam by Candice James

“Rithimus Aeternam” (Rhyme Eternal) is a fresh collection of rhyming poetry sectioned into eight themes: Surreal; Love; Nature; Dark; History & Story; Whimsy; Cowboy Poetry; and Miscellaneous. Poetry lover or not, you will find poems in this book that will resonate with your life, warm your heart and comfort your soul.

Bill Arnott’s Beat: World Poetry

I was making my way across town. Town being Vancouver, BC. We have to say that as there’s another one, a perfectly pleasant American one, its pleasantness being its proximity to Vancouver, BC. I was to be the guest on World Poetry Café, an unassuming FM radio program with a shockingly large listenership – one-hundred-thirty-three countries, at last count.

Words for the Traveler by Hugues Corriveau

I read the Antonio D’Alfonso translation. Think armchair travel, but a journey in which our guide’s thrown a select handful of darts at a map – personal, regionalized experiences – communicated through two distinct poetry styles. The book’s in fact bookended within itself – two chunks of time in Rome with a salad-like peppering of Europe, Asia, and a dollop of North America to fill the hoagie.

Fixing Broken Things by Gregory M. Cook

In Fixing Broken Things, Cook offers contemplative glances and lingering views on everyday life, as if observed through a window on the weather, landscape, and appearance or disappearance of things that matter. These observations act as mirrors that reflect the self and allow the merging of inner and outer worlds. The poet's rewards are discoveries of self and other in the magic visions and sounds that arise in combinations of words, like bits of winter ice reflecting prisms of light, life, and vision.

One Good Reason: A Memoir of Addiction and Recovery, Music and Love by Séan McCann and Andrea Aragon

I’m a fan of Séan McCann. Bought his music. Saw him perform with Great Big Sea. Had a joyous time, singing myself hoarse. Now I’ve read One Good Reason - his collaborative memoir - enticingly structured, chapters alternating between spouse-authors McCann and Andrea Aragon.

Bill Arnott’s Beat: Independents’ Day

Independent bookstores shouldn’t exist. Brick-and-mortar bibliophile havens are retail models waiting to be business school case studies, “Why These Can’t Work.” TV narcissi could bleat indefinitely as to why they’d never invest in such ventures. But they do exist. And despite every reason why they shouldn’t, they thrive.

Fishing for Birds by Linda Quennec

Three narrators. Three perspectives. Kate. Norma. Ivy. All island-bound, or freed. Perhaps we’re left to determine for ourselves. In Fishing for Birds, novelist Linda Quennec efficiently reveals facets of each protagonist, introducing us to these women – a young widow, her mother, and the spry nonagenarian Morrie-esque friend.

Bill Arnott’s Beat: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside Writers’ Collective

A clink and scrape of flatware on plates. Lips smack. A bronchial cough. Huge potted fichus stoop at the ceiling, the look of good-natured green giants. I have a fifty-cent cup of coffee, which is not a Curtis Jackson reference. That’s the price of coffee at the Carnegie Centre in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES), for those of us who belong.