The Homing Place: Indigenous and Settler Literary Legacies of the Atlantic by Rachel Bryant

From Wilfred Laurier University Press’ Indigenous Studies Series comes Rachel Bryant’s The Homing Place, which refuses to be pigeon-holed to any one category.

Reviews of Books on the 2018 Atlantic Book Awards Shortlist

The shortlists for the Atlantic Book Awards have been announced, and since The Miramichi Reader has reviews of seven of them (plus one children’s book), I thought it might be helpful to provide links to the reviews for the various nominees. The books that have been reviewed here will have links embedded in them and …

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Peninsula Sinking by David Huebert

(The following review is reproduced in part by the kind permission of Naomi MacKinnon of the Consumed by Ink book review blog. – James) Look at the cover of this book. It couldn’t be more stunning. With stories to match. Peninsula Sinking is David Huebert‘s first short story collection. He has won the CBC Short …

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The Endless Battle: The Fall of Hong Kong and Canadian POWs in Imperial Japan by Andy Flanagan

“At age twenty-five, James Andrew Flanagan began an adventure he believed might add a little excitement to his life…..his exciting journey quickly turned into a never-ending nightmare.” So begins author Andy Flanagan in his introduction to a little told part of WWII: the Battle of Hong Kong that started just hours after the Japanese attacked …

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The Sea Was In Their Blood by Quentin Casey

The following guest review is by David Chau, who is a writer of creative nonfiction, future author of a historical narrative set in Edo-Period Japan, and a University of King’s College MFA graduate in search of great stories. He lives in Kingston, Ontario.) [dropcap]To [/dropcap]outsiders eating their lobster suppers in New Glasgow or fish and chips …

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A Bird on Every Tree by Carol Bruneau

A Bird on Every Tree won The Very Best! Book Award for Short Stories. [dropcap]Carol [/dropcap]Bruneau is the author of six books, including the recent These Good Hands. Her 2007 novel, Glass Voices, was a Globe and Mail Best Book. She lives with her husband in Halifax, where she teaches writing at NSCAD University. [perfectpullquote align=”right” …

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Atlantic Animal ABC by Angela K. Doak

Here’s a new baby board book from Nimbus Publishing with collage illustrations of Atlantic Canada wildlife from A to Z. “From Atlantic puffin to zooplankton, with lots of wild Atlantic Canadiana in between–like lobster, brown bat, moon jellyfish, porcupine, and more–Atlantic Animal ABC is the perfect introduction for young ones to the region’s wildlife. With …

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The Greatest Hits of Wanda Jaynes by Bridget Canning

If F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby defined a time period, then Bridget Canning’s The Greatest Hits of Wanda Jaynes is a book defined by a time period, and that time period is now. 2017. Technology and social media figure so prominently in Wanda Jaynes that this book could not have been written 10 or …

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The Unlikely Redemption of John Alexander MacNeil by Lesley Choyce

Lesley Choyce is an active, prolific author and his latest title The Unlikely Redemption of John Alexander MacNeil (Roseway Publishing, 2017) is bound to be well-received by the reading public. It is the tale of the octogenarian widower John Alex (as he is known to everyone) living in rural Deepvale, Cape Breton where he still sets a place for his deceased wife of thirty years, Eva. He is someone who has always lived his life without caring what anyone else thought of him. We join him at the story’s outset where he is considering if he really is losing his mind….

Just Jen: Thriving Through Multiple Sclerosis by Jen Powley

While it is most often diagnosed in young adults aged 15 to 40, younger children and older adults are also diagnosed with the disease. MS can occur at any age but is usually diagnosed between the ages of 15 to 40, peak years for education, career- and family-building. MS has been diagnosed in children as …

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The Memory Chair by Susan White

I must admit to a certain guilty pleasure that comes from reading and reviewing Young Adult (YA) novels. First of all, they are an ‘easy’ read; the stories are often straightforward, devoid of gratuitous sex, profanity and violence (in most cases) and the author’s message is clear. Secondly, it makes me see things through the eyes of …

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