AMACAT (Thief for Hire, Book #2) by Chuck Bowie

Sean Donovan is back in action, albeit against his will, in AMACAT, book #2 of the “Thief for Hire” series penned by New Brunswick author Chuck Bowie. Forced out of his self-imposed retirement to help solve a murder (along with a vacationing Minnesotan couple) in PEI, Sean soon finds himself assisting an employee (who appeared briefly in book #1) at the Canadian embassy in London to clear her name in a breach of security case, as well as helping his sister out of a jam in Montreal, to whom her boyfriend has gifted a stolen, ugly (but valuable) fish mask, which results in having an overly aggressive insurance agent on her trail.… Continue reading

Nta’tugwaqanminen (Our Story) by the Gespe’gewa’gi Mi’qmawei Mawiomi

“Evolution of the Gespe’gewa’gi Mi’gmaq” (2016, Fernwood Publishing) this book is the product of years of research commissioned by the organization that represents the three communities of the Mi’gmaq that inhabit the northern part of the Gaspé Peninsula. It also involves the work of the community’s Elders (both oral and written stories), so it is a history written by Aboriginal peoples from an aboriginal perspective. It is also valuable for non-Aboriginals as well, for we learn of their history from their perspective, and come to see and understand their worldview and vision of life and their environment both before and after contact with Europeans.… Continue reading

Rapid Reviews: Two Non-Fiction Titles (April 2016)

The coming of spring brings with it many new book releases and the 'read' stack here at the Miramichi Reader is getting high. So I have resorted to writing some 'rapid reviews' of books that I have read and that do not require a lengthy article to summarize them. This works particularly well for non-fiction titles and I have two that I would like to incorporate.

The Glory Wind & Rain Shadow by Valerie Sherrard

Miramichi's resident young people's author Valerie Sherrard has had many of her books shortlisted and awarded in various categories, and The Glory Wind and Rain Shadow are no exceptions. I am reviewing these middle-grade reader books together since they both take place in the fictional town of Junction, Manitoba in the mid 1940s, and Rain Shadow compliments some of the story lines in The Glory Wind, so for the most emotional impact, The Glory Wind should be read first, but this is by no means a requirement.

In the Country by Wayne Curtis

New Brunswick author Wayne Curtis has released his latest title, In the Country (2016, Pottersfield Press) a collection of short stories, twelve in all, that will resonate with anyone familiar with the Miramichi River area where the author was born some 73 years ago.  It will especially appeal to readers who lived here over the decades of the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s. It was a time when there was a distinct social divide between country folk and those from the larger towns and villages in the Miramichi area.… Continue reading

Boss Gibson: Lumber King of New Brunswick by David Sullivan

cannot read a history of New Brunswick without coming across the name Alexander Gibson, or “Boss” as he was affectionately called by his family, friends and employees. So it was that after reading several different books on New Brunswick, I decided to see if anyone had published a book about the man. An Internet search quickly informed me that a book had just been published (in 2015) by David Sullivan entitled Boss Gibson: Lumber King of New Brunswick (Friesens Press).… Continue reading