Finding Fortune: Documenting and Imagining the Life of Rose Fortune (1774-1864) by Brenda J. Thompson

A daughter of runaway slaves, a Black Loyalist, the first Black police officer, a businesswoman and a friend of T.C. Haliburton; as a follow-up to her best-selling A Wholesome Horror, Brenda Thompson tells Rose Fortune’s story for the first time.

The Lost Sister by Andrea Gunraj

Andrea Gunraj is the author of The Sudden Disappearance of Seetha (2009, Knopf Canada), her first novel. The Lost Sister (2019, Vagrant Press) is two stories (or really two separate novels) which Ms. Gunraj has cleverly interleaved and zipped up into one considerable read, so that we have two stories, both with a "lost sister."

Exile Blues by Douglas Gary Freeman

Exile Blues could be one of the most important Black History novels to appear in recent years, and Douglas Gary Freeman is a writer worthy of consideration.

Black Cop: My 36 years in police work, and my career ending experiences with official racism by Calvin Lawrence, With Miles Howe

The title and subtitle pretty much sum up what this book is about: being black and facing systemic racism in two police organizations in a 36-year career. Calvin Lawrence was born in 1949 in Yarmouth and raised in Halifax. His … Continue reading

Black Beach by Glynis Guevara

Sixteen-year-old Tamera lives in La Cresta, a rural fishing community on a Caribbean island. Despite having the support of relatives, including her dad, Earl, her elder sister, Mary and her best friend and first cousin, Jan, she struggles to deal with her mom’s mental health issues and the absence of her boyfriend, Dalton who moves out of the village to work.

The Lynching of Peter Wheeler by Debra Komar

Author and forensic anthropologist Debra Komar has written two books to date dealing with murder and wrongful conviction in Atlantic Canada’s past. Her first book, The Ballad of Jacob Peck (2013, Goose Lane Editions) was about a murder inspired by … Continue reading