Celtic Knot: A Clara Swift Tale by Ann Shortell

A fine example of Canadian historical fiction, Ann Shortell’s Celtic Knot: A Clara Swift Tale (2018, Friesen Press) is constructed around the actual assassination of D’Arcy McGee, one of the fathers of confederation, on April 7th, 1868 as he was returning from Parliament to Mrs. Trotter’s boarding house. The assailant was never seen, but Patrick J. Whelan (“Jimmy”) was later arrested, convicted and hanged as the culprit.… Continue reading

Poplar Falls: The Death of Charlie Baker by Pierre C. Arseneault

Just down the road a piece from Miramichi on Route 126, you’ll pass through the lovely little Acadian town of Rogersville. Famous for their annual Bluegrass Festival, it is also the birthplace of Pierre C. Arseneault, whose most recent book is a bit of a departure from his past novels of “things that go bump in the night” type of story. Poplar Falls: The Death of Charlie Baker is a crime/mystery that’s a little bit different. … Continue reading

Lindstrom’s Progress (Trilogy #2) by John Moss

Intrigued by the unlikely invitation from a detective in Vienna to prove she murdered her lover, Harry Lindstrom finds himself in a strained alliance with a woman who seems to have stepped out of a painting by Klimt. His chaotic pursuit to unravel her story leads him home to Toronto, then back to Vienna, Salzburg, and salt mines near the ancient village of Hallstadtt, where stories from the past and present merge with horrific finality. Lindstrom's Progress is the second in a trilogy, between Lindstrom Alone and Lindstrom Unbound.

Lindstrom Alone (Trilogy #1) by John Moss

Canadian author John Moss has created a different type of private investigator in Harry Lindstrom: a retired philosophy professor that now specializes in murder cases. The remaining member of the Lindstrom & Malone team (Malone was his wife), he inhabits an apartment in downtown Toronto which he shares with the “ghost” or rather, the voice of his deceased wife, Karen. Think of Nick and Nora Charles as academics, and not as the socialites they portrayed in the popular “Thin Man” movies.… Continue reading

Watermark by Jennifer Farquhar

When I was a young lad, my parents owned a cottage that fronted on a small lake in South Eastern Ontario. While I swam in the water by day, I never ventured near the shore at night. That was when all kinds of things came forth out of the depths to languish on the shore – or so my young mind reasoned. In Jennifer Farquar’s Watermark (2018, Latitude 46 Publishing) Mina McInnis and her brother David actually sneak out of their house at night to swim in the cold waters of Lake Huron!… Continue reading