Brother by David Chariandy

The following review is by Naomi MacKinnon of Consumed by Ink, and is reproduced here with her kind permission.

you’re looking for that one beautiful gem, David Chariandy’s Brother just might be it. It’s raw and honest, and the writing is as smooth as silk.

Michael and his older brother Francis are close as they grow up in 1980s Scarborough, the sons of a single hard-working mother from Trinidad.… Continue reading

In The Cage by Kevin Hardcastle

Daniel is a cage fighter whose career is ended by an injury. He moves back to his hometown and falls into the world of crime. He and his wife, Sarah, struggle to keep their heads above water and to provide everything they can for their daughter. (Although, I couldn’t help but notice how much beer they drank as they contemplated their precarious financial situation.)

“Anything you ask him for he’ll try to give you,” Sarah said.Continue reading

Three Books by Angie Abdou Reviewed

(The following excerpt is reprinted by permission of Consumed by Ink)

I finally decided to pick up one of Angie Abdou’s books this summer. I’ve been meaning to for years now – I wish I could remember what it was that prompted me to do it – it was something I read about her last book, Between. So that’s the one I started with.

I loved it so much, I read The Bone Cage.… Continue reading

The Widow’s Fire by Paul Butler

The following guest review is by Naomi MacKinnon of the Consumed by Ink blog. She focuses on reading books from Atlantic Canada, but will also read books from other places as well. So you think Anne Elliot and Captain Wentworth live happily ever after? Well, Paul Butler wasn’t so sure. He saw a side of Mrs. Smith that the rest of us missed. Is she really the caring, innocent widow that Anne adores, or is she just manipulating us all into thinking she is? … Continue reading

The Sea Was In Their Blood by Quentin Casey

The following guest review is by David Chau, who is a writer of creative nonfiction, future author of a historical narrative set in Edo-Period Japan, and a University of King’s College MFA graduate in search of great stories. He lives in Kingston, Ontario.)

outsiders eating their lobster suppers in New Glasgow or fish and chips on the patio at North Rustico Harbour with a decor of lobster traps and fishing nets watching the sun setting into the sea, life on the east coast seems idyllic.… Continue reading

Boundary: The Last Summer by Andrée A. Michaud

It’s 1967 in the vacation cottage community of Boundary; an idyllic place to bring your family for the summer. Until a teenage girl goes missing. And then another. Replacing the peacefulness of the place with terror.

Who is responsible? is it one of the community members, or the ghost of an old man who used to live in the woods? The detective on the case works tirelessly to solve the crime before another tragedy takes place.… Continue reading

Advocate by Darren Greer

The following guest review is by Naomi MacKinnon of the Consumed by Ink book blog, who focuses her reading on books by Atlantic Canadians. Naomi claims she has kept a list of all the books she’s read since Grade 8!

Jacob has a fulfilling job in Toronto as a counsellor at a men’s outreach centre; men living with HIV. When he is asked to come home to Advocate, the small town in Nova Scotia where he grew up, to say goodbye to his dying grandmother, he has severe misgivings.… Continue reading

The Nearly Girl by Lisa de Nikolits

The Nearly Girl is a quirky exploration into people’s peculiarities and is absolutely riveting to read.

Amelia, the novel’s young protagonist, signs up for group therapy to assuage her teenage angst; she feels like an outcast and just yearns to be normal. Like most young adults, Amelia thinks she has been marred by her parent’s foibles. Her father, Henry, is an acclaimed, outré poet with preternaturally dark tendencies and her mother, Megan, is an aloof, withdrawn woman who shirks all parental responsibilities—finding solace in suntan booths and the gym instead.… Continue reading