Don’t Lose Sight: Vanity, incompetence, and my ill-fated left eye by Genevieve A. Chornenki

When Genevieve Chornenki escapes a brush with blindness, things never looked better-city pigeons, people, stainless steel pots. But questions about her experience linger: Who was responsible for her close call? Can she safeguard other people's eyesight? How do our eyes work, anyway, and why do they give so much pleasure?

Just the Usual Work: The Social Worlds of Ida Martin, Working-Class Diarist by Michael Boudreau and Bonnie Huskins

Just the Usual Work: The Social Worlds of Ida Martin, Working-Class Diarist offers a historical narrative of Saint John, New Brunswick in the post-war period. Built from short diary entries penned by Ida Martin, grandmother of co-author Bonnie Huskins, the book follows the Martin family and their larger community from 1945 to 1992

A Natural Balance: The K.C. Environmental Science Centre and Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens at Acadia University by Alex Novell and John Leroux

A Natural Balance: The K.C. Environmental Science Centre and Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens at Acadia University is a lovely volume about the history of the building and the gardens, starting with the original donation from Arthur Irving and family, to the conception stage and plan revisions, to building the garden and how it’s worked for the campus and the university community.

Excerpt from Tanya Bellehumeur-Allatt’s Peacekeeper’s Daughter: A Middle East Memoir

An excerpt from Peacekeeper’s Daughter, the story of a French-Canadian military family stationed in Israel and Lebanon in 1982-1983. Told from the perspective of a twelve-year-old girl, Peacekeeper’s Daughter parchutes the reader into the Lebanese Civil War, the Palestinian crisis, and the wave of terrorism—including the bombing of the American Embassy—that ravaged Beirut at the height of the siege.

In the Arms of Inup: The extraordinary story of a Guatemalan survivor and his quest for healing from trauma by Eve Mills Allen

Eve Mills Allen, a New Brunswick mental health therapist, has written the profoundly moving story of Jeremias, who at the age of 11 led his family to safety during the Guatemalan genocide against the Mayan peoples. Jeremias breaks the silence as he shares his memories with the author Eve Mills Allen over several years, and we learn how inadequate our mental health system is to fully heal those traumatized by war and genocide.