The One We Forgot to Love by Sandy Totten

The One We Forgot to Love is Sandy Totten’s first novel. Reflecting on her own life experience, she weaves the fictional story of one who battles the invisible opponent and of the loved ones who share those struggles. It is a heartwarming tale of a loving family learning to see the world from different perspectives and fighting to stay together against all odds.

Girl running by Diana Hope Tegenkamp

This stellar debut collection by Métis poet Diana Hope Tegenkamp takes us through many worlds and wonders. In Girl running, we find solace and outrage, grief and tenderness, bewilderment and beauty, all “entangled in hope and dreaming.” Evocative and powerful, this collection is well worth a look.

Stella’s Carpet by Lucy E.M. Black

Exploring the intergenerational consequences of trauma, including those of a Holocaust survivor and a woman imprisoned during the Iranian Revolution, Stella's Carpet weaves together the overlapping lives of those stepping outside the shadows of their own harrowing histories to make conscious decisions about how they will choose to live while forging new understandings of family, forgiveness and reconciliation.

When the Hill Came Down by Susan White

Keefe Williams lives a childhood of neglect and disconnect, feeling completely invisible. Known only for the story of the night his parents died and the freak event that killed them, he suffers silently holding on to the one thing in his life that sets him apart.

What the Oceans Remember: Searching for Belonging and Home by Sonja Boon

Sonja Boon’s heritage is complicated. Although she has lived in Canada for more than 30 years, she was born in the UK to a Surinamese mother and a Dutch father. An invitation to join a family tree project inspired a journey to the heart of the histories that have shaped her identity, as she sought to answer two questions that have dogged her over the years: Where does she belong? And who does she belong to?