When the Hill Came Down by Susan White

New Brunswick author Susan White writes great stories, suitable for young adult readers on up. Past reviews here at TMR include Fear of Drowning, The Memory Chair and Waiting for Still Water. Fine stories all, and I highly recommend them. Now, PEI’s Acorn Press has released her latest, When the Hill Came Down, a story about loss, jealousy, childhood abuse/misuse, love, and redemption.…

The Miramichi Fire: A History by Alan MacEachern

“Whatever happened to the Miramichi Fire? I first came across it in George Perkins Marsh’s groundbreaking 1864 Man and Nature, the first modern treatise on humans’ effects on nature. He recalled it in these terms: “The great fire of Miramichi in 1825, probably the most extensive and terrific conflagration recorded in authentic history, spread its ravages over nearly six thousand square miles, chiefly of woodland, and was of such intensity that it seemed to consume the very soil itself.”…

Atlantic Canada’s Greatest Storms by Dan Soucoup

Ralph Waldo Emerson said that “the wise man in the storm prays to God, not for safety from danger, but deliverance from fear.” Atlantic Canada’s Greatest Storms, by Dan Soucoup, delivers for those who wish to put the drama and tragedy of weather-induced disasters on the east coast into a historical perspective.

Soucoup’s publisher, Nimbus, describes the bookseller and publisher as “the author of numerous historical books about the Maritimes, including Failures and Fiascos, A Short History of Halifax, Railways of New Brunswick, and Know New Brunswick.…

The Sea Was In Their Blood by Quentin Casey

The following guest review is by David Chau, who is a writer of creative nonfiction, future author of a historical narrative set in Edo-Period Japan, and a University of King’s College MFA graduate in search of great stories. He lives in Kingston, Ontario.)

outsiders eating their lobster suppers in New Glasgow or fish and chips on the patio at North Rustico Harbour with a decor of lobster traps and fishing nets watching the sun setting into the sea, life on the east coast seems idyllic.…

Left to Die: The Story of the SS Newfoundland Sealing Disaster by Gary Collins

The story of the SS Newfoundland sealing disaster of 1914, in which 78 of 132 men died on the ice, is told in arresting fashion by Newfoundland author Gary Collins in Left to Die (2014, Flanker Press). Known as “The Story Man” in his native Newfoundland, Mr. Collins has written a book that will appeal to those who enjoy reading actual survival accounts from history.…