Best Fiction of 2021

To complement our "Top Ten Posts of 2021" list (which included an interview, poetry and non-fiction titles), we will now turn our attention to the best fiction of the year. The selections below are based on the recommendations of The Miramichi Reader's team of contributors.

Winners of “The Very Best!” Book Awards for 2021

The Miramichi Reader's "The Very Best!" Book Awards are all new for 2021. Four categories, four winners and four honourable mentions. The winners were also selected by an external jury (aside from the Non-fiction category which was overseen by James). All judges expressed how hard it was to narrow each or their respective categories down to two, not to mention having to pick one winner. Congrats to all of the 'chosen ones' as well as the authors whose books appeared on the 2021 longlist.

Announcing “The Very Best!” Book Awards Longlist for 2021!

The Miramichi Reader’s popular “The Very Best!” Book Awards (“the Vee-Bahs”) are very different for 2021. To simplify things, we have only four categories: Novels, Non-Fiction, Short Fiction, and Poetry. From the following longlist, our jury (this is new, too!) … Continue reading

Gone Viking: a Travel Saga by Bill Arnott

To “go Viking” is to embark on an epic journey. For more than eight years, Bill Arnott journeyed throughout the northern hemisphere, discovering sites Scandinavian explorers raided, traded, and settled – finding Viking history in a wider swath of the planet than most anthropologists and historians ever imagined.

Meadowlands: A Chronicle of the Scovil Family by Virginia Bliss Bjerkelund

Meadowlands - home to the family of Morris and Harriet Scovil at the beginning of the 20th century; nine hundred acres of interval and forest land at Scovil Point on the St. John River across from Gagetown, New Brunswick; a farm that produced hay and horses; a place that nurtured the life of a remarkable family.

Dirty Birds by Morgan Murray*

In late 2008, as the world’s economy crumbles and Barack Obama ascends to the White House, the remarkably unremarkable Milton Ontario – not to be confused with Milton, Ontario – leaves his parents’ basement in Middle-of-Nowhere, Saskatchewan, and sets forth to find fame, fortune, and love in the Euro-lite electric sexuality of Montreal.