New Brunswick

The Emily Taylor Smith Interview

Emily Taylor Smith grew up in Salisbury, New Brunswick, taking her first wooded hikes in the southeastern part of the province and learning about nature from her father, an avid writer, gardener and trapper. She developed a love of long-distance coastal hiking as a young woman and has now walked the coastal roads of all three Maritime provinces: Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, as well as the Gaspé peninsula.

The Days That Are No More: Tales of Kent County New Brunswick by Loney Hudson

The Days That Are No More chronicles people from Kent County, New Brunswick during the 1920s through the 1980s in communities of Targettville, Main River, Bass River, Smith Corner, Emerson, Harcourt, Clairville, Beersville, Fordsmills, Brown's Yard, West Branch, South Branch, Mundleville, and Rexton. They tell of a time when most of the people of Kent County had large families, and children left home at a very young age to find work wherever it could be found. Life was often hard. They lived through war and poverty, and experienced hardships and modernization. This immersive collection of lives tells of a time that no longer exists, except in the heart and minds of booklovers.

Must-Have New Brunswick Books of 2020*

The books in this “Must Have New Brunswick Books of 2020” list cover all ages and tastes and will give you an idea of the diversity of voices – both young and old – that emanate from here. This list includes fiction for young readers as well as mature ones, and non-fiction titles concerning New Brunswick, and its history, people, and geography.

Fixing Broken Things by Gregory M. Cook

In Fixing Broken Things, Cook offers contemplative glances and lingering views on everyday life, as if observed through a window on the weather, landscape, and appearance or disappearance of things that matter. These observations act as mirrors that reflect the self and allow the merging of inner and outer worlds. The poet's rewards are discoveries of self and other in the magic visions and sounds that arise in combinations of words, like bits of winter ice reflecting prisms of light, life, and vision.

Two Novels of Le Grand Dérangement

The Great Deportation or Le Grand Dérangement, of the Acadian peoples, began in 1755 in the area now called the Bay of Fundy. Homes and farms were burned, and many of the 14,000 inhabitants of Acadia were herded aboard British ships and sent off to the Thirteen Colonies in what is now the New England states. The following two novels, both suitable for mature young readers on up, focus on this time of upheaval and the separation of families.

Wayne Curtis Receives the New Brunswick Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Literary Arts

At a recent Words on Water event at the Newcastle Public Library, a series of engraved wood plaques crafted by local artist Gloria Savoie was unveiled. They are to mark the "indoor" portion of the Miramichi Literary Trail. In attendance were the authors Sandra Bunting, Chuck Bowie, Doug Underhill, and Wayne Curtis.