Two Novels of Le Grand Dérangement

The Great Deportation or Le Grand Dérangement, of the Acadian peoples, began in 1755 in the area now called the Bay of Fundy. Homes and farms were burned, and many of the 14,000 inhabitants of Acadia were herded aboard British ships and sent off to the Thirteen Colonies in what is now the New England states. The following two novels, both suitable for mature young readers on up, focus on this time of upheaval and the separation of families.

The Peddlers: The Fuller Brush Man, the Lords of Liniment and Door to Door Heroes in Nova Scotia and Beyond by Blain Henshaw

Mr. Henshaw's book, while of regional interest to Nova Scotians, will undoubtedly recall to mind travelling salesmen from your past as it did mine (if you are old enough!).  Furthermore, it does go beyond provincial borders to look at products such as Buckley's, Rawleigh's and Watkins that while developed elsewhere, were sold door-to-door in the Maritime region.

Margaret Atwood, Campobello Island and the Passamoquoddy by Rachel Bryant

The following article was penned by Rachel Bryant, author of The Homing Place: Indigenous and Settler Literary Legacies of the Atlantic. It was originally published on her website on September 21st, 2019 and is reproduced here with her kind permission.

Casey: The Remarkable, Untold Story of Frederick Walker “Casey” Baldwin by John G. Langley

Frederick Walker "Casey" Baldwin—athlete, engineer, aeronaut, sailor, politician, activist, conservationist—was a true gentleman, modest to a fault. As one of Alexander Graham Bell's young associates, Casey was the first Canadian to fly.

The Court of Better Fiction: Three Trials, Two Executions, and Arctic Sovereignty by Debra Komar

The Court of Better Fiction is a concise, scathing, and at the same time, sympathetic account of a travesty of justice committed against the Indigenous peoples living above the Arctic Circle.